Showing posts with label education. Show all posts
Showing posts with label education. Show all posts

Wednesday, December 1, 2010

What adults can learn from kids

Tuesday, November 3, 2009

"Under the Sea” at the Singapore Science Centre

Our family was invited by proud sponsors Mead Johnson to attend the premiere of Imax “Under the Sea” at the Singapore Science Centre last week. We love taking the kids to the Science Centre and this is our second trip to the Imax theatre this year.

“Under the Sea” is a new IMAX 3D adventure that transport moviegoers to some of the most exotic and isolated undersea locations on Earth, allowing viewers to experience face-to-face encounters with some of the most mysterious and stunning creatures of the sea. Our first trip to the Imax theatre to watch “Sea Monsters” was back in June when we Vera was 2-and-a-half ( we didn’t take Nadya then as we were afraid the noise would scare her). Vitali and I enjoyed ourselves tremendously although the show scared Vera so much she fell asleep at the beginning of the movie out of fright.

It is amazing how much difference a few months makes. This time, at almost 3 years of age, Vera was super excited to watch the show. She probably thought the vivid life size sharks, giant octopus, turtles and sea snakes are really swimming to her as she screamed in delight and held on to me tightly to me throughout the show. Here is a trailer from the movie.




The show is fun and interesting for families and kids of all ages, provided they have the patience to sit through a 45 minute documentary and are not easily spooked by big fish eating other smaller fish.

The film features several interesting sea creatures that will capture your child’s attention. However, the documentary style of the show (even though it is narrated by funny guy Jim Carry) may lose very young kids towards the middle. I would definitely recommend this for kids above the age of 3 as an inspirational and entertaining way to explore the beauty and natural wonder of oceans, as well as the impact of global climate change.

The IMAX Under the Sea website also contains educational resources to download for kids by age group. The materials include worksheets, pictures, and even hands-on activities that kids can do to learn about sea animals, geography, the environment, and more.
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Promotion to the Science Centre and Imax Theatre!

As a leader in pediatric nutrition and a mission to create nutritional brands and products that nourish the body and mind, Mead Johnson Nutrition is collaborating with the Singapore Science Centre to offer a free admission ticket for your child to the Science Centre with every purchase of Enfagrow A+ / Enfakid A+ / EnfaSchool A+. This promotion is available from Enfa A+ milk purchased from any NTUC Fairprice outlets from 5 - 30 November. The coupon also includes discounts to the Omni Theatre. Simply bring along the coupon packaged at the top of the milk can to the Science Centre to redeem your free ticket. Enjoy!

Saturday, October 17, 2009

Kangaroo giving birth

Do you know how kangaroos got their name? A myth goes that when European explorers first saw these strange hopping animals they asked a native aborigine what they were called. He replied "kangaroo" meaning "I don't understand" your question. The explorers thought this was the animal's name. And that's how the kangaroo got its name.

The young are born the size of a lima bean after a gestation of 31–36 days (this is equivalent to a human embryo at seven weeks old). Immediately after it is born, a joey finds its way to its mother's pouch to continue its second stage of development there. He will usually stay in the pouch for about nine months before starting to leave the pouch for small periods of time. It is usually fed by its mother until reaching 18 months. You have to show your kids this incredible video of a kangaroo giving birth and continuing its development inside his mother's pouch.



After watching this video, I almost wished humans gave birth the same painless way as kangaroos. And in case you think that only kangaroo babies live in their mother's pouches during infancy, you may be surprised to know that kangaroos are just one of a species of mammals called "marsupials" that carry their young in pouches through early infancy. Koalas, oppossums and the tasmanian devils are all examples of marsupial mammals that carry their young in distinctive pouches.
Like a newborn kangaroo that instinctively finds its way to mommy's pouch to continue its development right after birth, studies have shown that human babies can also benefit in their development from being carried in a pouch from birth.

Many parents can testify that babies who are carried in a soft pouch carrier close to their bodies cry less, are more calm and content. They also seem to sleep more peacefully, nurse better, gain weight better and develop better. More about the benefits of a pouch which is often considered parenting's best kept secret can be found here!

I guess we can now also add human beings as a evolved class of marsupial mammals?

Sunday, September 21, 2008

Sesame St - How paper is made



Another one of my favourite clips from Sesame St. I used to be so intriqued by how the dirty mushy old paper could be transformed into such flat and luxurious rolls of white paper.

Monday, February 11, 2008

Ants on the Apple

Thought I will share a fantastic find on Pupsik. If you have not heard about it, there is a wonderful Phonics book out there in stores called "Ants on the Apple". It has a really catchy tune and teaches children the sounds of the alphabet. Vera loves it and even my husband and I are hooked! The pictures in the book are really old school too. A wonderful educational tool that is sure to be a hit with your child if you are teaching them the alphabet.

Click here to listen to the song. Available at IMM (Singapore) , Children's world #02-47 for $28

Warning: it may be difficult to get it out of your head if you listen to it too long.